Towards a Political Literary Geography

Laurie McRae Andrew

Abstract


Literary geographical work to date has left the political aspects of literary space under-examined. How might we explicitly frame the question of a political literary geography? This position paper draws on Raymond Williams' idea of the 'knowable community' of the literary text in order to sketch possible directions for such an avenue.

Keywords


politics; spatial event; ideology; knowable community; literary geography

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References


Cole, T. (2011) Open City. London: Faber.

Hones, S. (2014) Literary Geographies: Narrative Space in Let The Great World Spin. New York: Palgrave MacMillan.

Low, G. (2006) ‘The Natural Artist: Publishing Amos Tutuola’s ”The Palm-Wine Drinkard” in Postwar Britain.’ Research in African Literatures, 37(4), pp. 15-33.

Massey, D. (2005) For Space. London: SAGE.

Saunders, A. (2013) ‘The Spatial Event of Writing: John Galsworthy and the Creation of Fraternity.’ Cultural Geographies, 20(3), pp. 285-298.

Tutuola, A. (1961) [1952] The Palm Wine Drinkard. London: Faber.

Williams, R. (1977) Marxism and Literature. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Williams, R. (2011) [1973] The Country and The City London: Spokesman.


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